Worlds Largest Selection of CBG Flower

Order by 5 PM, ships same day

Just arrived

Epic daily deals

Gift ideas

CBG Flower

A rising trend in the cannabis industry doesn’t contain high amounts of THC or CBD. Instead, hemp strains are actively bred to provide sufficient levels of CBG – a newly researched cannabinoid that holds a wide variety of supportive qualities that may surpass those of CBD.

Read along to understand what CBG flowers are, why it’s so challenging to produce, what it does, and what CBG flowers can be used for.

Frequently Asked Questions & Facts

Cannabigerol, better known as CBG, is a non-psychoactive and naturally occurring cannabinoid that’s found in cannabis plants. There are over 100 known cannabinoids, and many are still in their infancy of research. CBG is one of them – however, scientists have found enough evidence to support the idea that it’s more supportive than CBD. 

Typically, the vast majority of cannabis plants contain 1% or less of cannabigerol. The primary reason why the concentration of CBG is so low is that cannabigerol is a precursor compound. 

CBG is the precursor to CBD and THC. This means that, without CBG, THC and CBD wouldn’t exist. This game-changing cannabinoid exists in abundance as the cannabis plant flowers. However, it’s during the late flowering phase that it begins to synthesize into THC and CBD. 

Due to this function, CBG is almost always found in trace amounts.

CBG was discovered in the 1960s; however, it wasn’t until recently that it’s gained recognition. Now that CBG is under the spotlight, cultivators and consumers alike are scrambling to produce or experience it.

Prior to CBG flowers, CBG concentrates were the only way for consumers to experience the qualities of CBG. However, these CBG extracts came at a high cost. This is because CBG extract requires a significant amount of material to extract from. 

A single ounce of CBG isolate may require hundreds of pounds of raw cannabis material – not to mention the intricate process of stripping away all other cannabinoids through chromatography. 

CBG producers began to think – how can we decrease the cost of CBG for consumers while allowing us to produce more? The answer came in the form of CBG hemp strains. Just how CBD strains allow for low THC content and abundant cannabidiol – the same is being done for CBG.

Hemp breeders are selectively breeding hemp cultivars that express high levels of CBG. Although they are not as common as high THC or CBD strains, CBG varieties are quickly starting to crop up.

Therefore, CBG flowers come from special CBG-dominant hemp strains. The flower is harvested and allowed to dry and cure. This end product is high in CBG and low in THC and CBD. Remember, the focus is on CBG – nothing else.

The flowers carry the natural terpenes, which gives them a pleasing aroma and flavor that are experienced when consumed by smoking or vaporizing. 

CBG flowers allow consumers to have affordable access to CBG, which wasn’t possible with expensive CBG isolates.

Cannabigerol isn’t psychoactive, which means it doesn’t produce a high effect. Instead, it carries anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. Furthermore, its interactions with the endocannabinoid system produce effects that are similar to CBD.

CBG is known to work directly with the endocannabinoid system. Unlike CBD, it triggers both the CB1 and CB2 receptor groups. As such, CBG triggers the endocannabinoid to active, which results in a wide variety of supportive effects throughout the body.

This cascade-effect is the result of CBG molecules binding directly with CB1 and CB2 receptors. Scientists have shown through various tests that low doses of CBG trigger a strong signaling response from endocannabinoid receptors. 

The endocannabinoid system is responsible for a wide variety of functions within the body, such as pain regulation, motor skills, memory function, the immune system, and much more. 

Once activated by CBG, various supportive effects can be experienced in regards to

  • Inflammation
  • Glaucoma
  • Anti-Bacterial
  • Cancer

In each study, CBG was recorded to significantly support specific issues, such as bowel diseases, glaucoma, cancer-cell inhibition, depression, anxiety, and much more. 

However, it’s important to realize that the studies regarding CBG and its function within the human body are ongoing. Ultimately, the future of CBG is incredibly bright as more research sheds light on its many uses.

CBG flowers can be used in a number of ways. When you purchase CBG flowers, you’ll find that they look very similar to CBD or THC flowers. However, these flowers are filled with the supportive qualities of CBG.

CBG flowers can be smoked in a glass pipe, bong, bubbler, or joint. If you prefer to stay away from combustion-based methods, then a vaporizer is the next best bet. A portable vaporizer allows you to place a tiny amount of CBG flower into a chamber vaporize it at the perfect temperature.

Since inhalation of cannabinoids is incredibly effective, you’ll feel the supportive qualities of CBG within minutes. Smoking or vaporizing CBG flowers offers users a high rate of bioavailability, which surpasses ingestion and topical-based methods.

If you’re wondering what you can use CBG flowers for – read on. 

CBG flowers can be used to relax the mind and body because it stimulates the endocannabinoid system to produce a myriad of effects. Whether you’d like to enjoy CBG with a cup of coffee or you desperately need a good night’s rest – CBG flowers can assist you in your quest for comfort.

With so many up-and-coming use cases, CBG flowers can be consumed to support issues such as inflammation, chronic pain, depression, and so much more. The fact that CBG isn’t psychoactive opens many doors for current and future use for those who seek the supportive qualities that hemp has to offer.

[SOURCES]

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19112869

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18681481

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25269802

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23415610

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29977202

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6021502/

CBG Flower

A rising trend in the cannabis industry doesn’t contain high amounts of THC or CBD. Instead, hemp strains are actively bred to provide sufficient levels of CBG – a newly researched cannabinoid that holds a wide variety of supportive qualities that may surpass those of CBD.

Read along to understand what CBG flowers are, why it’s so challenging to produce, what it does, and what CBG flowers can be used for.

What’s CBG?

Cannabigerol, better known as CBG, is a non-psychoactive and naturally occurring cannabinoid that’s found in cannabis plants. There are over 100 known cannabinoids, and many are still in their infancy of research. CBG is one of them – however, scientists have found enough evidence to support the idea that it’s more supportive than CBD. 

Typically, the vast majority of cannabis plants contain 1% or less of cannabigerol. The primary reason why the concentration of CBG is so low is that cannabigerol is a precursor compound. 

CBG is the precursor to CBD and THC. This means that, without CBG, THC and CBD wouldn’t exist. This game-changing cannabinoid exists in abundance as the cannabis plant flowers. However, it’s during the late flowering phase that it begins to synthesize into THC and CBD. 

Due to this function, CBG is almost always found in trace amounts.

CBG was discovered in the 1960s; however, it wasn’t until recently that it’s gained recognition. Now that CBG is under the spotlight, cultivators and consumers alike are scrambling to produce or experience it.

How Are CBG Flowers Produced?

Prior to CBG flowers, CBG concentrates were the only way for consumers to experience the qualities of CBG. However, these CBG extracts came at a high cost. This is because CBG extract requires a significant amount of material to extract from. 

A single ounce of CBG isolate may require hundreds of pounds of raw cannabis material – not to mention the intricate process of stripping away all other cannabinoids through chromatography. 

CBG producers began to think – how can we decrease the cost of CBG for consumers while allowing us to produce more? The answer came in the form of CBG hemp strains. Just how CBD strains allow for low THC content and abundant cannabidiol – the same is being done for CBG.

Hemp breeders are selectively breeding hemp cultivars that express high levels of CBG. Although they are not as common as high THC or CBD strains, CBG varieties are quickly starting to crop up.

Therefore, CBG flowers come from special CBG-dominant hemp strains. The flower is harvested and allowed to dry and cure. This end product is high in CBG and low in THC and CBD. Remember, the focus is on CBG – nothing else.

The flowers carry the natural terpenes, which gives them a pleasing aroma and flavor that are experienced when consumed by smoking or vaporizing. 

CBG flowers allow consumers to have affordable access to CBG, which wasn’t possible with expensive CBG isolates.

What Does CBG Do?

Cannabigerol isn’t psychoactive, which means it doesn’t produce a high effect. Instead, it carries anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory properties. Furthermore, its interactions with the endocannabinoid system produce effects that are similar to CBD.

How Does CBG Work in The Body?

CBG is known to work directly with the endocannabinoid system. Unlike CBD, it triggers both the CB1 and CB2 receptor groups. As such, CBG triggers the endocannabinoid to active, which results in a wide variety of supportive effects throughout the body.

This cascade-effect is the result of CBG molecules binding directly with CB1 and CB2 receptors. Scientists have shown through various tests that low doses of CBG trigger a strong signaling response from endocannabinoid receptors. 

The endocannabinoid system is responsible for a wide variety of functions within the body, such as pain regulation, motor skills, memory function, the immune system, and much more. 

Once activated by CBG, various supportive effects can be experienced in regards to

  • Inflammation
  • Glaucoma
  • Anti-Bacterial
  • Cancer

In each study, CBG was recorded to significantly support specific issues, such as bowel diseases, glaucoma, cancer-cell inhibition, depression, anxiety, and much more. 

However, it’s important to realize that the studies regarding CBG and its function within the human body are ongoing. Ultimately, the future of CBG is incredibly bright as more research sheds light on its many uses.

How Can You Use CBG Flowers?

CBG flowers can be used in a number of ways. When you purchase CBG flowers, you’ll find that they look very similar to CBD or THC flowers. However, these flowers are filled with the supportive qualities of CBG.

CBG flowers can be smoked in a glass pipe, bong, bubbler, or joint. If you prefer to stay away from combustion-based methods, then a vaporizer is the next best bet. A portable vaporizer allows you to place a tiny amount of CBG flower into a chamber vaporize it at the perfect temperature.

Since inhalation of cannabinoids is incredibly effective, you’ll feel the supportive qualities of CBG within minutes. Smoking or vaporizing CBG flowers offers users a high rate of bioavailability, which surpasses ingestion and topical-based methods.

What Can You Use CBG Flowers For?

If you’re wondering what you can use CBG flowers for – read on. 

CBG flowers can be used to relax the mind and body because it stimulates the endocannabinoid system to produce a myriad of effects. Whether you’d like to enjoy CBG with a cup of coffee or you desperately need a good night’s rest – CBG flowers can assist you in your quest for comfort.

With so many up-and-coming use cases, CBG flowers can be consumed to support issues such as inflammation, chronic pain, depression, and so much more. The fact that CBG isn’t psychoactive opens many doors for current and future use for those who seek the supportive qualities that hemp has to offer.

[SOURCES]

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19112869

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18681481

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25269802

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23415610

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29977202

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6021502/